The History of Fencing

Fencing is something many home and business owners take for granted. It is not often the most important part of a property, but it serves a great purpose that has not always been so easy to obtain in the past. The history of fencing is part of the struggle of humanity to survive. 

Fences were crucial in the development of early agriculture. While shepherds were able to defend their herds on horseback, much of the livestock that civilizations depended on needed to be fenced in to protect it from wild animals. Fencing, in turn, became a vital part of any established town. 

For much of history fencing was typically constructed of simple wooden boards or stone. Ornamental fencing was occasionally produced, but only for castles or places of worship. Middle-class families had to build their own fencing in order to protect the property or to keep animals from straying too far off the farm. It wasn’t until the Industrial Revolution that manufactured fencing material was brought to agriculture. 

In the late 19th century, barbed wire and chain links were introduced. These minimal wire fencing options were ideal for livestock and affordable for most farmers in the Industrial Age. These fencing innovations led to the invention of vinyl and mass-produced wood and metal fencing, which made it easier for suburban homes to afford them. By the 1950s, electric fences were becoming mainstream in agriculture, and in the 1970s most of the modern fencing material you see today had become available to homeowners. 

Famous Fences in History

Fences have even made history throughout the millennia for defensive purposes and in culture. The Great Wall of China is the longest defensive wall to ever be built in history and still stands after 3,000 years. Though it is not the same as what we think of as modern fencing, it held the same purpose for the Chinese people of the time. 

The fencing around Buckingham Palace is considered to be one of the most ornate fences in the world. It is not just a decorative outdoor element, but a symbol for how protective the British people are of their royalty, The fencing is a sign of respect for their history and heritage, and still stands today to serve that purpose. 

Modern fencing comes from a long history of innovation and is an integral part of most homes today. To learn more about your home or commercial fencing options, contact FloriFence!

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